What does citizenship education look like in a country affected by armed conflict and economic crises?

Can Sesame Street’s Big Bird help fight terrorism? And what does a children’s television show tell us about the challenges and paradoxes of multicultural education?

It takes about 15 minutes to drive from Edgewood to Alamo Heights in San Antonio, Texas. Yet the schools in each neighborhood are worlds apart.

In our fast-changing world, how should we think about the curriculum? For what macro competencies should education aim? And has the COVID-19 pandemic revealed any failures in our education systems worldwide?

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended higher education internationalization. Many universities are worried the pandemic will cause a huge drop in international student enrollment and their associated fees, which account for a large part of many university budgets.

The Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on the neck of George Floyd and killed him was training new recruits. One of the trainees was on his third day on the job. That got me thinking: How are police trained? What type of education do police officers receive? And are there any connections between type and quality of education and training to the excessive police force so common in black communities?

My guest today is Gary Cordner, a retired professor and dean, former police officer and former police chief. Most recently he served as Chief Research Advisor for the National Institute of Justice in the U.S. Department of Justice. He has actively studied and written about community policing, police administration, police agency accreditation, and police education. We spoke last week on a range of issues including structural racism and the prospects of defunding the police.

Citation: Cordner, Gary, interview with Will Brehm, FreshEd, 202, podcast audio, June 15, 2020. https://www.freshedpodcast.com/garycordner/

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Today is the 200th episode of FreshEd! To celebrate this milestone, we take you behind the scenes to meet our talented team: Lushik Wahba, Sherry Yang, Hang Duong, Fatih Aktas, Injung Cho, Iveta Silova, Yuto Kitamura, David Edwards, Arathi Sriprakash, and Keita Takayama. These are the people who edit and produce episodes; the people who manage FreshEd’s social media; and the board members who provide guidance. This episode gives you a sense of the massive volunteer effort it has taken to get to 200 and describes where FreshEd aims to go in the future. Of course, none of this would have been possible without FreshEd’s dedicated audience. Thank you for the past 200 episodes!

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an emergency situation for most education systems worldwide. Schools are closed. Students are at home. Stress and anxiety are high. Domestic violence and food insecurity are on the rise. And we are uncertain when this emergency will end.

Luckily, there is a large body of research on education in emergencies that can help guide us through this unprecedented situation. My guest today is Sarah Dryden-Peterson, a foremost scholar on education in conflict and post-conflict settings.

Sarah Dryden-Peterson is an Associate Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She is the co-founder and director of REACH, a collaborative initiative that provides guidance and resources on key topics in education, migration, and displacement for educators, policymakers, and researchers. She has recently started Books of Belonging, an online video series where she reads a picture book each day of the week.

Books of Belonging | Episode 1 | The Why-Why Girl

Enjoy the first episode of 'Books of Belonging' featuring 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙒𝙝𝙮-𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙂𝙞𝙧𝙡 by Mahasweta Devi as read by HGSE Professor Sarah Dryden-Peterson.'Books of Belonging' is a new video series that seeks to bring people together around the combination of big ideas and comfort we find in picture books.

Posted by Harvard Graduate School of Education on Monday, March 23, 2020

Today the famed anthropologist Arjun Appadurai joins me to talk about the current pandemic and its impacts on globalization and education. We were supposed to speak in March at a Live Event during the annual conference of the Comparative and International Education Society in Miami, but like most things in life, the pandemic got in the way.

In our conversation, Arjun thinks through the pandemic using some of the ideas for which he’s most known, including the “scapes” of globalization. He also talks about his newest book published last year entitled, Failure, which was co-written with Neta Alexander.

Stay tuned until the end of our conversation where Arjun gives us a peek into some of his newest thinking on ideas not-yet-published! Arjun Appadurai is a Professor at New York University, and at the Hertie School in Berlin. He is a member of the UNESCO Futures of Education commission.